Tourism London Welcome Centre

The Welcome Centre is where you can find featured art by local Indigenous artists.

Stained Glass Dreamcatcher by Renee Jewell
Stained Glass Dreamcatcher by Renee Jewell

Boozhoo, Shekoli, Koolamalsi!

Covid-19 has impacted our community and the arts in both enduring and impactful ways over this past year. The London Arts Council continues to look for meaningful and creative opportunities to collaborate with Indigenous Artists and one such chance was a partnership with Tourism London at the Welcome Centre on Wellington Road South.

The painting Trois Jiggers Métis by Annette Sullivan
Trois Jiggers Métis by Annette Sullivan

In December 2020 a call-out was made to Indigenous Artists to submit their work for purchase. The selected artwork represents the diversity of Indigenous artists from London and the local First Nations.


Traditional Métis Ceremonial Smoking Hat by Annette Sullivan
Traditional Métis Ceremonial Smoking Hat by Annette Sullivan

Paintings Summer Dreams and Summer Dream by Steve Maracle
Summer Dreams and Summer Dream by Steve Maracle
Ethan Bear by Steve Maracle
Ethan Bear by Steve Maracle

The Welcome Centre is where you can find featured art by local Indigenous artists:

  • Annette Sullivan

  • Brenda Collins

  • Chandra Nolan

  • Mike Cywink

  • Oscar Marroquin-Ponce

  • Renee Jewell

  • Steve Maracle

Their artwork represents various themes that speak to Indigenous worldviews and experiences and are created from diverse materials including textiles, beadwork, cedar, porcupine quills, and birch bark, acrylic, and glass.

Two sets of beaded earrings displayed
Created by Chandra Nolan
A painting of an eagle in traditional style
The Provider by Mike Cywink
A circular abstract painting called Oscar Marroquin-Ponce
Hummingbird by Oscar Marroquin-Ponce

Brenda Collins created two mosaic murals that are installed on the south exterior wall of the Welcome Centre and feature a Medicine Wheel and Two Row Wampum to signify the ongoing and historical relationship of the local First Nations communities to each other and to the surrounding communities.


The murals also help to situate visitors to the city as well as Londoners to the traditional territory of the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee, and Lenape peoples. The mosaics represent relationship with the land, friendship, and responsible allyship.


Glass Medicine Wheel and Glass Two Row Wampum by Brenda Collins installed at the London Tourism Welcome Centre
Glass Medicine Wheel and Glass Two Row Wampum by Brenda Collins

The London Arts Council is committed to the ongoing work of relationship building with Indigenous artists and communities.


For more information about the London Arts Council and collaborations with Indigenous Artists please visit the London Arts Council website at www.londonarts.ca.


Miigwech, Yaw^ko, Anushiik!